Five Deep Breaths

My wife is reading a book called “The Art of Stopping  Time, Practical Mindfulness for Busy People” by Pedram Shojai. Each day offers a short chapter with a suggested exercise. It may be spending time in nature, or fasting from social media for a day.

Yesterday’s was to take five deep breaths every 30 minutes throughout the day, using a timer. I decided to try it.

Here are some observations:

Thirty minutes goes by very quickly. It seemed like every time I turned around, the timer was going off. I was also surprised by how much I packed into each 30-minute period. This shed some light on periods when I was focused — and the integers when I was multitasking and flitting from one thing to another. The timer gave me a chance to pause and check in with myself.

I spotted the impulse to do other things while I took the five deep breaths — stretch or look at my phone or simply keep working on whatever I was working on at the moment. It took a conscious decision to stop everything and ONLY breathe. I also saw this thought more than once: “I don’t have time to stop.” But not once did this turn out to be true. The five deep breaths took less than a minute.

At one point in the morning, I was nearing the end of a fast and furious freewrite when the timer went off. I was tempted to ignore it, but didn’t. The five deep breaths didn’t ruin my flow; in fact, they slowed me down just enough that when I returned to the keyboard, picking up right where I had left off was easy.

Full disclosure: I missed a few hours. At some point mid-morning, I forgot to restart the timer after my deep breaths. I walked to town to meet Luping for our hour of tutoring, then did some errands on foot. When I resumed my practice in the early afternoon, the five breaths turned into 10 along with some loud yawning and big jaw opening. Suddenly, the interruption was fully welcome, a reminder to get up off my ass, plant both feet on the floor, and say hello to the body.

Late-afternoon brought hot chocolate around a small bonfire with Pearl’s Hebrew school class, celebrating the Jewish holiday of Tu b’Shvat, also known as the new year of the trees. Along with this small caffeine hit, the cold woke me back up, and I detected a subtle connection between the deep breathing I’d been doing throughout the day and the singing we were now doing around the fire. Come to think of it, there’s also a natural correlation between deep breathing and trees, since without them we’d be in deep breathing trouble.

Today, I’m giving it another go. Having a chance to check in every half hour may seem excessive, but really it’s a good way to get in the habit of breathing more consciously throughout the day. I’m already feeling more aware of when my breath gets shallow or neglected. I like this idea of tending to it, in the same way I would another person under my roof.

If breath is life, who are we when we’re running around being busy or trying to cram 10,000 things into every increment of time? Is that actually living?

Practices like this bring me a chance to see my default habits anew. Rather than thinking I failed some test if I forgot to set my timer and breathe deeply the whole day, I’m always more interested in what happens when I don’t judge myself but bring patience and care to the process of trying things. Anything that smacks of holier-than-thou-ness will send me running for the hills, but I will gladly play with ways to wake myself up, mentally and physically, and make more of me available to whatever or whomever is in front of me.

I have six minutes left till my next five deep breaths, but you know what? I’m not waiting. I’m taking them right now, even as my hands fly over the keyboard.

When do you neglect your breath? When do you tend to it? What reminds you to come back to yourself throughout the day? 

One thought on “Five Deep Breaths

  1. I took deep breaths while reading this, and I’ve set my timer. In the past year, I’ve been getting more out of my yoga practice than flexibility. The connection to breath is key. I don’t have a hectic go-go-go lifestyle (far from it), but this reminder to return to body and spirit sounds like a good one. Thanks to you and your wife for the idea.

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